Results of Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Uric Acid in Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents

Severity of SDBPatient and Polysomnographic Characteristics

A total of 94 children and adolescents were initially included in the study; afterward, 1 subject was excluded because of an abnormal serum creatinine value of 1.5 mg/dL. Of those subjects, 44% were boys, 58% were prepubertal (mean age, 11.1 ± 2.5 years; age range, 6.3 to 16.3 years). The mean BMI z-score was 2.31 ± 0.50 (range, 1.32 to 3.83); and 25 subjects (27%) were classified as overweight, and 68 subjects (73%) as obese. All subjects were nondiabetic.

All children had a normal UA excretion rate (mean rate, 0.33 ± 0.06 mg/dL; range, 0.20 to 0.47 mg/dL); and the mean urinary UA/creatinine ratio was 0.58 ± 0.13 (range, 0.31 to 0.85). There were 15 subjects (16%) with a total urinary creatinine concentration of < 500 mg/d, possibly suggesting an unreliable 24-h urinary collection. Excluding these 15 subjects did not result in significant changes in any of the subsequent analyses. A fasting measurement of serum UA was available for 62 patients (67%). Mean serum UA was 4.8 ± 1.4 (range, 1.5 to 8.8). The polysomnographic data of the subjects with or without SDB are presented in Table 1. There was no difference in age, sex, pubertal stage distribution, and anthropometric variables between these three groups.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Overweight and Obese People with Canadian Health&Care Mall

Patient Characteristics

We recruited children and adolescents who were 6 to 17 years of age who presented as overweight or obese between January 2001 and June 2006 at the Pediatric Obesity Clinic of the Antwerp University Hospital. Children were not included when they had any chronic medical condition, or any genetic, neuromuscular or craniofacial syndromes. Patients were classified as prepubertal or pubertal. All subjects underwent all measurements as part of their routine clinical evaluation. This case study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Antwerp University Hospital.

Anthropometry

Height, weight, waist circumference, and waist/hip ratio were measured by standardized techniques. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in square meters and was further analyzed as z-score. Children were classified as overweight or obese according to the definitions of the International Obesity Task Force. Canadian Health&Care Mall on http://healthcaremall4you.com/interesting-facts-about-diet-together-with-canadian-healthcare-mall.html gives an explanation how to reduce weight and know more about diet and its peculiar features.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Uric Acid in Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents

sleep-disordered breathingOverweight and obese children and adolescents have a higher risk of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Sleep apnea in obese children is often associated with oxygen desaturation, and this is proportional to the degree of obesity. This could hypothetically result in tissue hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia is commonly defined as inadequate oxygen supply against oxygen demand in the integrity of cellular metabolic processes. This results in an impaired formation of adenosine triphosphate from adenosine diphosphate and in a net degradation of adenosine triphosphate to adenosine diphosphate and monophosphate. This leads to the release of purine intermediates and the purine catabolic end product, uric acid (UA). Previous studies have shown that elevated levels of these degradation products provide good indexes of tissue hypoxia in, for instance, infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

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